Eye condition affects use of touch screens: study

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Older adults with central vision loss caused by age-related macular degeneration have no problem with accuracy in performing touch screen tasks, but their performance is slower, according to a study in the October issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry.

Performance is slower especially during the initial "exploration" phase of touch screen tasks, according to the research by Quentin Lenoble, PhD, of Université Lille Nord de France, and colleagues.

"The advent of digital displays and use of computer screens has opened up many new possibilities for reading activities and travel aids for AMD sufferers," notes Anthony Adams, OD, PhD, editor-in-chief of Optometry and Vision Science. "This study suggests that there can be new strategies in making touch screen scenes and materials more identifiable to the many people with low vision caused by AMD" and other eye conditions, he adds.


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